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Fishing Reports

Monday, January 28th, 2013

Pulled out of the slip today for this 5 hr. trip with lots of trepidation.

Decided to by-pass yesterday’s wreck and opt for one a little farther down the beach. As the baits went down I waited nervously. Much to my relief, it was clear the tog wanted to play. The next few hours held constant action with only one short “slack” period. When the horn finally blew, we had 15 in the box, 1 fish shy of the limit for 4 anglers.

Monday, January 28th, 2013

Every see the movie “Groundhog Day”?

Well, by the end of Sunday’s trip I was feeling exactly like Bill Murray. This crew of tog professionals from NJ & NY experienced the exact same scenario as last weekend. A big blow comes through early/mid-week and the fish refuse to bite for several days. The only difference between this weekend and last, it took until late morning for the bite to get good.

Monday, January 28th, 2013

Out for a five hour striper trip with a crew of four

Trolled our way north until we found some fish on one of our inshore hills. The bite was slow but steady enough to keep us there. By the end of the trip we had two in the box, 29 & 37″, lost two others during the fight and had another half-dozen bites that didn’t come tight. Chad H also did battle with the largest skate I’ve ever seen, putting his new spinning combo to the ultimate test.

Archive

We will continue to offer striper (rockfish) trips through the entire month of December. The fish are here and should remain around through December.

11/23/12 Out for a five hour striper trip with a crew of four. Trolled our way north until we found some fish on one of our inshore hills. The bite was slow but steady enough to keep us there. By the end of the trip we had two in the box, 29 & 37″, lost two others during the fight and had another half-dozen bites that didn’t come tight. Chad H also did battle with the largest skate I’ve ever seen, putting his new spinning combo to the ultimate test.

11/10/12 & 11/11/12 Every see the movie “Groundhog Day”? Well, by the end of Sunday’s trip I was feeling exactly like Bill Murray. This crew of tog professionals from NJ & NY experienced the exact same scenario as last weekend. A big blow comes through early/mid-week and the fish refuse to bite for several days. The only difference between this weekend and last, it took until late morning for the bite to get good.

11/04/12 Pulled out of the slip today for this 5 hr. trip with lots of trepidation. Decided to by-pass yesterday’s wreck and opt for one a little farther down the beach. As the baits went down I waited nervously. Much to my relief, it was clear the tog wanted to play. The next few hours held constant action with only one short “slack” period. When the horn finally blew, we had 15 in the box, 1 fish shy of the limit for 4 anglers.

11/03/12 After two weeks of sitting idle thanks to the feds extending the sea bass closure and super storm Sandy it was nice to be back at the helm. Today’s trip was to be a sea bass extravaganza but with the closure it’s gonna be a tog extravaganza instead. Baits went down on a super good wreck in fairly sporty winds but not much wave action. Five minutes pass, no bites. Ten minutes and nothing, now I’m worried. At the two hour mark we only have one in the box and had a handful of bites. To make matters worse, the wind in now a solid 20 to 25 knots and very chilly. After another hour of agony, I offer the guys the option of trimming the trip by a couple hours and saving lots of cash since the fish clearly aren’t biting. Back in the slip after a few hours with one lonely fish in the box.

10/20/12 This crew of super nice guys had a dilemma, go with the sure thing and slam some tog or roll-the-dice and run offshore looking for something big. They decide to go big but also wanted to take some crabs along as a back-up plan. Threw the spread out when we hit 40 fathoms in ugly, cold, green water. About 90 minutes into the day I smell something familiar. At the exact same moment I hear Dave say “oh no”, I turn around to see one of the guys eating the long evil fruit, aka banana. About 15 minutes later our shotgun rod takes off. As I’m handing the rod off the bridge I feel the hook pop free. The next two hours go on without a bite so the crew decides to throw in the towel and make the long run back inshore to the wrecks. The first two stops found OK action but way too many sea bass than tog. I decide to run in a little farther to a wreck that has been super over the last few trips. As I’m setting the anchor I hear the guys start to heckle one of their own. Somehow, he forgot he had a second banana in his stuff. “Well don’t expect much now” I jokingly toll them, never knowing I’d be all too correct. The last hour was painful knowing this wreck is loaded with tog but they didn’t want to bite. Back in the slip with only 3 keepers in the box, DANG BANANAS!!!!

10/14/12 Inshore action with two fathers and four 14/15 yr old boys. Sent the crabs down and before every bait hit the bottom, birthday boy had a nice tog headed for the box. The bite was great although the crew seemed to do much more feeding than catching. By late morning our limit was reached so we turned our attention to triggerfish. Problem was, the tog were so aggressive, the triggers didn’t have a chance. Largest tog of the day was 7 lb. caught after we had our limit so the big boy was released. Back in the slip with 14 tog and 3 triggers in the box.

10/13/12 A last minute 4 hour deal with a father and his 12 yr old son from northern MD. Anchored on one of my favorite near shore tog wrecks and found outstanding action. These guys we amazed just how hard tog can pull. The boys first fish nearly took the rod right out of his hands. Our limit was reached with ease so the rest of the fish were released to fight another day.

10/12/12 Out for a day of wreck action on a forecast that was predicting nasty winds by early afternoon, but “light” winds until then. I wanted to see if the sea bass bite had improved from what the other boats had experienced the prior week….poor action! Lines hit the water 17 mile from the inlet in winds that were far more that “light”. After a dozen drifts with ever increasing speed, it was clear the sea bass are still thumbing their nose at us. Decided to move back in to calmer water and hope the tog or triggers want to play. Spent the rest of the day 9 mile off the beach working small pieces of structure. By the days end we had a nice mix of triggerfish, sea bass and taylor bluefish in the box.

10/06/12 Today was an ashes scattering trip with a family from NJ.

10/05/12 With the deep gear getting hit hard the day before I decide our best chance for putting fish in the box is to work the 35-40 fathom line for wahoo, mahi and tuna. Our first bite takes about 45 minutes and it’s a wahoo. Ten feet from the gaff the fish makes a hard left creating enough slack in the line to allow him to shake the hook. Swung back over the same spot and had another short bite. Worked the area but couldn’t find any other fish so I decided to troll south to another hill. As soon as we get on the hill our deep rod takes off, fifteen minutes later we put a 40 lb. wahoo in the box. Worked the area hard but no other bites. Moved east a few miles and immediately get slammed on our deep rod again. This time we put a 30 lb. hoo in the box. Five minutes later the charter asks if we can go look for some sea bass since these fish are just too big for our 11 year old Jr. angler. We decide to troll the 15 miles and hope to get jumped by something the boy can handle. Thirty minutes later our short rigger get smashed by a nice gaffer mahi which also makes it to the box. I swing around and our deep rod gets hit but the wahoo gets the bait just behind the hook. A few minutes later another smaller mahi grabs a short bait and our Jr. angler has the fish he’s been wanting for over two years, a mahi he landed all by himself. The guys still want to spend a little time on the wreck so we pull in the lines and make the twenty twenty-five minute run. Spent the last little bit of the day messin with sea bass.

10/04/12 With five minutes left until the charter was supposed to arrive I get a call telling me they’re still 90 minutes away. Dave and I scrap the original plan of running to the deep gear for mahi since I know another guy who was going to try the same thing and with this delay he’ll be able to beat us there getting first dibs on the fish. Instead we decide to hang around the 40 fathom line and look for wahoo. About 90 minutes into the shortened day the shotgun line takes off and I’m sure we have a monster hoo on by the way the fish is pulling. Twenty minutes later we have the fish close to the boat but still can’t see because of the angle of the sun and chop on the water. Dave grabs the leader and let’s out a discussed groan, it’s a white marlin that’s foul-hooked. Worked hard the rest of the day but only had a couple small bites that never came tight. As for the other boat that ran to the gear, they came home with 35 mahi.

09/30/12 Out for a short day of trolling followed by some wreck fishing if the trolling doesn’t produce. Well, just like yesterday, we’re just about to throw in the towel when our short rigger goes down, it’s a wahoo. Suddenly another hoo comes across and grabs the tiny swivel on the main line that has the fish immediately cutting the line loosing the fish. Five seconds later our “shotgun” bridge rod takes off. I throw the drag to her and before I can hand the rod to down to the mate another bridge rod goes off and this is a good one, smoking the drag! Things are OK, one guys in the chair and the other has a stand-up belt. At some point the guy with the belt knocks the reel into free spool and before the mate can throw the drag back up, the bigger wahoo is gone. Now our day revolves around this one fish that’s still hooked-up. A few minutes later we manage to put a 35 lb. wahoo in the box. What’s that saying about any luck being bad luck…..yea.

Fishing Reports

Monday, January 28th, 2013

Pulled out of the slip today for this 5 hr. trip with lots of trepidation.

Decided to by-pass yesterday’s wreck and opt for one a little farther down the beach. As the baits went down I waited nervously. Much to my relief, it was clear the tog wanted to play. The next few hours held constant action with only one short “slack” period. When the horn finally blew, we had 15 in the box, 1 fish shy of the limit for 4 anglers.

Monday, January 28th, 2013

Every see the movie “Groundhog Day”?

Well, by the end of Sunday’s trip I was feeling exactly like Bill Murray. This crew of tog professionals from NJ & NY experienced the exact same scenario as last weekend. A big blow comes through early/mid-week and the fish refuse to bite for several days. The only difference between this weekend and last, it took until late morning for the bite to get good.

Monday, January 28th, 2013

Out for a five hour striper trip with a crew of four

Trolled our way north until we found some fish on one of our inshore hills. The bite was slow but steady enough to keep us there. By the end of the trip we had two in the box, 29 & 37″, lost two others during the fight and had another half-dozen bites that didn’t come tight. Chad H also did battle with the largest skate I’ve ever seen, putting his new spinning combo to the ultimate test.

Archive

We will continue to offer striper (rockfish) trips through the entire month of December. The fish are here and should remain around through December.

11/23/12 Out for a five hour striper trip with a crew of four. Trolled our way north until we found some fish on one of our inshore hills. The bite was slow but steady enough to keep us there. By the end of the trip we had two in the box, 29 & 37″, lost two others during the fight and had another half-dozen bites that didn’t come tight. Chad H also did battle with the largest skate I’ve ever seen, putting his new spinning combo to the ultimate test.

11/10/12 & 11/11/12 Every see the movie “Groundhog Day”? Well, by the end of Sunday’s trip I was feeling exactly like Bill Murray. This crew of tog professionals from NJ & NY experienced the exact same scenario as last weekend. A big blow comes through early/mid-week and the fish refuse to bite for several days. The only difference between this weekend and last, it took until late morning for the bite to get good.

11/04/12 Pulled out of the slip today for this 5 hr. trip with lots of trepidation. Decided to by-pass yesterday’s wreck and opt for one a little farther down the beach. As the baits went down I waited nervously. Much to my relief, it was clear the tog wanted to play. The next few hours held constant action with only one short “slack” period. When the horn finally blew, we had 15 in the box, 1 fish shy of the limit for 4 anglers.

11/03/12 After two weeks of sitting idle thanks to the feds extending the sea bass closure and super storm Sandy it was nice to be back at the helm. Today’s trip was to be a sea bass extravaganza but with the closure it’s gonna be a tog extravaganza instead. Baits went down on a super good wreck in fairly sporty winds but not much wave action. Five minutes pass, no bites. Ten minutes and nothing, now I’m worried. At the two hour mark we only have one in the box and had a handful of bites. To make matters worse, the wind in now a solid 20 to 25 knots and very chilly. After another hour of agony, I offer the guys the option of trimming the trip by a couple hours and saving lots of cash since the fish clearly aren’t biting. Back in the slip after a few hours with one lonely fish in the box.

10/20/12 This crew of super nice guys had a dilemma, go with the sure thing and slam some tog or roll-the-dice and run offshore looking for something big. They decide to go big but also wanted to take some crabs along as a back-up plan. Threw the spread out when we hit 40 fathoms in ugly, cold, green water. About 90 minutes into the day I smell something familiar. At the exact same moment I hear Dave say “oh no”, I turn around to see one of the guys eating the long evil fruit, aka banana. About 15 minutes later our shotgun rod takes off. As I’m handing the rod off the bridge I feel the hook pop free. The next two hours go on without a bite so the crew decides to throw in the towel and make the long run back inshore to the wrecks. The first two stops found OK action but way too many sea bass than tog. I decide to run in a little farther to a wreck that has been super over the last few trips. As I’m setting the anchor I hear the guys start to heckle one of their own. Somehow, he forgot he had a second banana in his stuff. “Well don’t expect much now” I jokingly toll them, never knowing I’d be all too correct. The last hour was painful knowing this wreck is loaded with tog but they didn’t want to bite. Back in the slip with only 3 keepers in the box, DANG BANANAS!!!!

10/14/12 Inshore action with two fathers and four 14/15 yr old boys. Sent the crabs down and before every bait hit the bottom, birthday boy had a nice tog headed for the box. The bite was great although the crew seemed to do much more feeding than catching. By late morning our limit was reached so we turned our attention to triggerfish. Problem was, the tog were so aggressive, the triggers didn’t have a chance. Largest tog of the day was 7 lb. caught after we had our limit so the big boy was released. Back in the slip with 14 tog and 3 triggers in the box.

10/13/12 A last minute 4 hour deal with a father and his 12 yr old son from northern MD. Anchored on one of my favorite near shore tog wrecks and found outstanding action. These guys we amazed just how hard tog can pull. The boys first fish nearly took the rod right out of his hands. Our limit was reached with ease so the rest of the fish were released to fight another day.

10/12/12 Out for a day of wreck action on a forecast that was predicting nasty winds by early afternoon, but “light” winds until then. I wanted to see if the sea bass bite had improved from what the other boats had experienced the prior week….poor action! Lines hit the water 17 mile from the inlet in winds that were far more that “light”. After a dozen drifts with ever increasing speed, it was clear the sea bass are still thumbing their nose at us. Decided to move back in to calmer water and hope the tog or triggers want to play. Spent the rest of the day 9 mile off the beach working small pieces of structure. By the days end we had a nice mix of triggerfish, sea bass and taylor bluefish in the box.

10/06/12 Today was an ashes scattering trip with a family from NJ.

10/05/12 With the deep gear getting hit hard the day before I decide our best chance for putting fish in the box is to work the 35-40 fathom line for wahoo, mahi and tuna. Our first bite takes about 45 minutes and it’s a wahoo. Ten feet from the gaff the fish makes a hard left creating enough slack in the line to allow him to shake the hook. Swung back over the same spot and had another short bite. Worked the area but couldn’t find any other fish so I decided to troll south to another hill. As soon as we get on the hill our deep rod takes off, fifteen minutes later we put a 40 lb. wahoo in the box. Worked the area hard but no other bites. Moved east a few miles and immediately get slammed on our deep rod again. This time we put a 30 lb. hoo in the box. Five minutes later the charter asks if we can go look for some sea bass since these fish are just too big for our 11 year old Jr. angler. We decide to troll the 15 miles and hope to get jumped by something the boy can handle. Thirty minutes later our short rigger get smashed by a nice gaffer mahi which also makes it to the box. I swing around and our deep rod gets hit but the wahoo gets the bait just behind the hook. A few minutes later another smaller mahi grabs a short bait and our Jr. angler has the fish he’s been wanting for over two years, a mahi he landed all by himself. The guys still want to spend a little time on the wreck so we pull in the lines and make the twenty twenty-five minute run. Spent the last little bit of the day messin with sea bass.

10/04/12 With five minutes left until the charter was supposed to arrive I get a call telling me they’re still 90 minutes away. Dave and I scrap the original plan of running to the deep gear for mahi since I know another guy who was going to try the same thing and with this delay he’ll be able to beat us there getting first dibs on the fish. Instead we decide to hang around the 40 fathom line and look for wahoo. About 90 minutes into the shortened day the shotgun line takes off and I’m sure we have a monster hoo on by the way the fish is pulling. Twenty minutes later we have the fish close to the boat but still can’t see because of the angle of the sun and chop on the water. Dave grabs the leader and let’s out a discussed groan, it’s a white marlin that’s foul-hooked. Worked hard the rest of the day but only had a couple small bites that never came tight. As for the other boat that ran to the gear, they came home with 35 mahi.

09/30/12 Out for a short day of trolling followed by some wreck fishing if the trolling doesn’t produce. Well, just like yesterday, we’re just about to throw in the towel when our short rigger goes down, it’s a wahoo. Suddenly another hoo comes across and grabs the tiny swivel on the main line that has the fish immediately cutting the line loosing the fish. Five seconds later our “shotgun” bridge rod takes off. I throw the drag to her and before I can hand the rod to down to the mate another bridge rod goes off and this is a good one, smoking the drag! Things are OK, one guys in the chair and the other has a stand-up belt. At some point the guy with the belt knocks the reel into free spool and before the mate can throw the drag back up, the bigger wahoo is gone. Now our day revolves around this one fish that’s still hooked-up. A few minutes later we manage to put a 35 lb. wahoo in the box. What’s that saying about any luck being bad luck…..yea.